Too Little Sleep Could Have Teens Piling on Pounds

The group found that at age 12, just 34% of participants slept at least 8 hours a night. This dropped to 23% by age 14 and to 19% by age 16. The teens who got the most sleep also woke less throughout the night and invested more time in bed.

The following is excerpted from an online brief article published by HealthDay.
New research study suggests that not getting enough sleep may doom adolescents and teens to obesity and poorer health as they get in the adult years.
Those who slept less than 8 hours a night were most likely to be obese or overweight than their peers who do get enough sleep, the research study discovered. Those much shorter sleepers were similarly more than likely to have a mix of other health issues, consisting of excess fat around the middle, raised blood pressure, and uncommon blood fat and sugar levels.
” Our research study exposes that the bulk of teenagers do not get sufficient sleep, and this is gotten in touch with excess weight and attributes that promote weight gain, potentially setting them up for future issues,” specified study author Jesús Martínez Gómez. He is a scientist in training at the Cardiovascular Health and Imaging Laboratory at the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research in Madrid.
The research study participants were 1,229 teens with a common age of 12 at baseline.
The scientists determined the youths sleep for 7 days using a wearable activity tracker 3 times throughout the study, at ages 12, 14 and 16. The private investigators then utilized body mass index to determine obese and obesity status.
The kids were classified as really brief sleepers if they slept less than 7 hours a night, brief sleepers if they got 7 to 8 hours, and ideal if they had 8 or more hours of sleep.
The group discovered that at age 12, only 34% of individuals slept a minimum of 8 hours a night. This dropped to 23% by age 14 and to 19% by age 16.
Obese and weight problems frequency was 27% at age 12, 24% at age 14, and 21% at age 16, the findings showed.
Compared with optimum sleepers, overweight/obesity was 21% and 72% more most likely in very brief sleepers at ages 12 and 14 years. Brief sleepers were 19% and 29% more likely to be overweight/obese compared with optimum sleepers at ages 12 and 14.
The research will exist at the European Society of Cardiology annual conference in Barcelona. Findings offered at medical conferences must be considered initial up until released in a peer-reviewed journal.
Source: HealthDayhttps:// consumer.healthday.com/how-many-hours-of-sleep-do-teens-need-2657874932.html.

The team discovered that at age 12, only 34% of participants slept at least 8 hours a night. This dropped to 23% by age 14 and to 19% by age 16. The group found that at age 12, just 34% of participants slept a minimum of 8 hours a night. This dropped to 23% by age 14 and to 19% by age 16.